There’s a lot of information out there when it comes to sustainable building—so much that even structural engineers sometimes have to sift through it all to check what’s accurate and what isn’t. If you’re as interested in the subject as we are, we know you’ve read top to bottom about it. The only issue, however, is separating fact from fiction. You’d be surprised at how much “information” about sustainable building is anything but! To help you know what’s what, we’ve compiled a few myths about sustainable building, as well as evidence as to why you shouldn’t believe what others have to say.

1) You Have to Sacrifice Beauty for Sustainability

This particular myth has long been perpetuated by architects who’ve witnessed less-than-attractive buildings erected in the name of sustainability. While this may have been true in the past, when structural engineers were first deciphering how to create greener buildings in the first place, this certainly isn’t the case now. In fact, this really may not have ever been the case! With a simple Google search, you can easily find beautiful and sustainable structures all over the world. Engineers are discovering all sorts of ways to mold green materials into beautiful forms on a regular basis.

2) Sustainable Buildings Are Ineffective

Some experts believe the energy input of sustainable buildings isn’t much different from their non-sustainable counterparts. However, research and documentation shows this belief is far from the truth. Every residential structural engineer who’s successfully completed a project has seen amazing results in terms of energy and resource conservation. This is why so many people are seeking out more information on how they can “go green.”

Sustainability also offers efficient benefits by way of cost. Researchers are finding the initial value of a home already optimized for sustainability is smaller in comparison to a home that must be renovated into being “greener.” While simply reducing your energy usage and renovating your home for this purpose will cut costs in the long run, building green in the first place provides a much faster means of saving money and energy in comparison to the more gradual decrease provided by energy switching. Converting to greener living in the first place also produces costs within itself due to the change in equipment, meaning homeowners will have to spend even more out of pocket. Overall, it is far easier to plan a “green” home from the beginning than to try to make the switch with a less-sustainable home.

3) Only Hippies Are Interested in Sustainability

The ‘60s have long been dead. Beyond this point, in the face of mounting climate change, we believe everyone should be more invested in green living. You don’t have to be a hippie to simply conserve energy! In fact, the majority of people seeking out residential engineering services don’t reside in communes or anything of the sort, but live in suburbs and cul de sacs, just like everyone else. It’s irresponsible to assume only tree huggers care about climate change or energy conservation. Everyone can make a difference in this regard, and everyone should care about the planet. It’s the only home we all have.

4) Sustainability Is Only A Phase

Again, this is far from the truth! Green building and living has been developing for years and years, originating back during the time of Frank Lloyd Wright, who first called the concept “organic architecture.” Structural engineers have spent decades improving upon the principle, bolstered by governmental concern about resource and energy consumption. The “green living” movement we have now is simply one stage in a long evolutionary chain—one we hope shows no signs of stagnation.

We hope this article provides you with a more factual concept of green living and its importance. To learn more about sustainability and how you can better incorporate it into your life and home, we encourage you to get in touch with us.